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Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 06 Nov 2016 21:57
by Belandrie Meave
Fix it and apologize, vod, then move on. Taylir kebise pakod.
My crowd would put it like this:
Spoiler: show
"When a Jedi behaves badly in public, an observer might think, 'If this Jedi is a representative of the whole Order, then plainly no Jedi is worth respect.' On meeting a second Jedi, who behaves better than the first, that same person might think, 'Does this say that half the Jedi are good, and half bad?' On meeting a third Jedi, who behaves as well as the second, the person thinks, 'Was the first Jedi an exception, then?' In this way, only by the good behavior of several Jedi can the public be certain that the poor behavior of one Jedi was unusual. Thus, it takes many Jedi to undo the mistakes of one."

And as a corollary, because you're the only Mando they're likely to meet and if you're screwing things up chances are you've known them a long time, well, evaar'la tuur, evaar'la jag; live it down, let the 'you' of the next day help change their opinion of the 'you' of today.
Trust me, it's not that big of a deal to make a couple screwups - the people who matter know that that's all it is, a screwup, not how you are usually. We're only human, a work in progress.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2016 03:48
by Tempest
Foreword:
By no means am I closing conversation on other topics I (or others) have posed.

My Question:
I have met some people who dream about "prince charming" or some such osik, and it got me thinking. I know the Mando ideals (i.e. mandakarla), but nobody is a shining example of Mando-ness, especially with such a lack of Mandalorian mentors. Is it like "close as you can get" or something? If I were to follow the logic through, I would guess it goes that if the person you are "in love with" (loosely using the term, if I may) does not posses at least a few of these qualities, the relationship likely will not work out for one or more of several reasons (it may get agitating if one spouse or the other just cannot or will not keep their environment clean, honor their word, respect the other's right to their own opinion, etc.-- maybe the two just are not compatible as people through no fault of their own.) I do admit I am the last person to ask for social advice of any sort. But, hey, I do my best to learn.

*chuckles* I am not sure which is rarer, a group of Mandos discussing romantic relationships or a group of Mandos discussing philosophies. I hope this whole thing is neither.

Interested to hear you all's thoughts.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 18 Nov 2016 04:23
by Vlet Hansen
Well, I'd say a lot of the Mando ideals you mentioned are things many people would take for granted as things they feel essential for a good relationship. Honesty, willingness to compromise, these are pretty essential elements of a good relationship.

What would be attractive to a Mandalorian? Well, I can't speak for everyone, but as far as I'm aware, Mandalorian culture isn't too into makeup and fancy dinner manners. We focus more on practical things. Riduur who'll work out with you? Good. Riduur who can handle whatever life throws at them? Great! We're less fancy steak restaurant dates and more hiking and camping dates people.

But hey, that's just my view on it.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 19 Nov 2016 03:20
by Tempest
So you are saying that those traits are also highly valued among aruetiise? I guess my view might be inaccurate since the last time I thought about marriage as an aruetii was when I was a fairly young kid.

I guess I am asking the question "how close to perfect do they have to be?" Shab, how close does anybody asking that question have to be? Is it just a relative level between the two individuals?

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 19 Nov 2016 03:40
by Vlet Hansen
It's not about perfection, really, it's just about compatibility. And the compatibility needn't be perfect, either, it's about what the two people want and are willing to give up.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 19 Nov 2016 05:02
by Tempest
That said, would it be fair to take from that that, aruetii or Mando, any good relationship (not just romantic) is just about putting the other person first and not giving up on them? That as long as the two people agree to keep working on the relationship, the desired character traits (Mando or otherwise) will eventually work out (granted with hard work)?

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 19 Nov 2016 15:51
by Vlet Hansen
'lek, I'd say so

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 29 Nov 2016 14:11
by Tempest
I was doing some work recently, and I thought to myself, "I think I could get more done if I wasn't so shabla cold."

If it matters, I promptly fixed the problem.

My question is: is it nu'mandakarla to say that? (perhaps that depends on motivation? If so, how do I stay motivated in the right way?)

If you (speaking to anyone) were in my place, would you have toughed it out as being "atin" or called it fact and grabbed a jacket as being "mirdala"?

Are both opinions equally mandakarla?

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 29 Nov 2016 21:25
by Vlet Hansen
"Being badass" shouldn't come before practicality. That said, it's always a good idea to know HOW to do things the hard way. Like with math, therre's calculators online for damn near any function ever, but having an idea of HOW it works is useful. And in a military context, or disasters and such, it's essential to be able to keep going even when you lack most of your usual tools and conveniences.

Like in the military, you generally don't WANT to overburden your soldiers and then send them on long hikes with no sleep, but in the event that's the only way to get the job done, hard training beforehand allows you to be capable of it.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 30 Nov 2016 19:38
by Belandrie Meave
I agree with Vlet - and I think it was Robert Stirling (SAS, British) who said it, a good soldier makes himself as comfortable as circumstances permit because if he's uncomfortable then at best he's distracted and at worst he's going to get sick, and then he's no use to anyone.
Sure it's useful to be able to cope with discomfort and inconvenience - that's what hiking is for. In your free time. When you're not trying to do anything important at the same time. If you're at work, you're on your employer's time and it's your duty to make the best possible use of that time.
This is a practical culture above all - if you can get more done overall by going to grab a jacket, and if there is a jacket available to be grabbed, you'd be an utreekov not to take advantage of this opportunity to get more work done. If there isn't one, shrug and get on with the job.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 11 Dec 2016 20:06
by Tempest
I suppose, in my mind at least, the next logical question is: what should be the difference between being around a solid aruetii and being around a solid Mando'ad, be it at work or while relaxing? What is it that indicates "hey, that person must be a Mando" more than just mandakarla qualities in an aruetii?

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 14 Dec 2016 22:24
by Vlet Hansen
Well, the Resol'nare are really the only difference. Think of it maybe like a motorcycle club. Members of a club aren't the only people with similar qualities, but only members of that club are part of the in-group.

Just like different units in the same military feel distinctly different to each other.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 17 Dec 2016 23:30
by Tempest
Would it be accurate to say that it is the sum of the components, not the components themselves, that make up a Mandalorian? That although any di'kut can follow orders of a strong leader, although many could make uj'ayli, although some still believe in family and honor, that it is our aliit, our skraan, and our ruus'la kar'ta which show to any who stick by us long enough to truly see us that we are, indeed, Mandalorian?

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 27 Dec 2016 21:48
by Vlet Hansen
exactly!

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2017 01:40
by Tempest
How about you all (referring to anyone)? Does anyone have a question they would like to pose or a thought they would like to share?

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 10 Jan 2017 19:04
by Vlet Hansen
I wish I had some grand wisdom or something to post, but I really don't...

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 11 Jan 2017 04:26
by Tempest
*laughs*

I think the closest this thread has gotten to "grand wisdom" would be a few of the posts by Adi'karta. 'Course it was supposed to be more like "there's this bit of Mando philosophy; how does that translate to a real-world action?"

From what I have seen, you are one of the most practical people on this forum.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 20 Jan 2017 03:34
by Tempest
Okay, then.

I was talking with one of ner vode awhile back about my choice to be Mandalorian, and our conversation got me thinking...

How do you think one should practically react to knowledge of Mando culture?

Does it make the most sense to you as a person to dive full in by following the resol'nare and claiming the name "Mandalorian"?

In your experience, is it more reasonable to simply learn from this society (fictional from most people's perspective)?

Perhaps it is just a set of ideals too high to attain in everyday life?

Interested to hear you all's thoughts as this seems like an especially relevant topic.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 27 Jan 2017 23:19
by Vlet Hansen
While there's a difference possible between those two choices, I don't think it's necessary. The way Mandalore feels to me is a combination between regional identity, some sort of religion, and a political party. Your level of zealotry and "patriotism," for want of a better word, is variable, but it doesn't make you "not a Mandalorian. Some people might just like the philosophy, some might study Mando'a, some might go all the way and build armor and get very serious about it.

The way I see it, fussing over the details is a philosophical matter better relegated to drunken debates and talk shows than actual serious living. If you feel a connection to the life, then that's your path. Exactly how far down that road you walk before you make your home is your business.

Re: Applying Our Culture Practically

Unread postPosted: 12 Feb 2017 05:10
by Tempest
Alright, how about something more basic: how/why did you (speaking to whomever) first get into this whole Mando thing?

For me it was reading the books by Karen Traviss and being motivated to learn about the character traits promoted by Mandalorians (atin, ruusan, aliit).